johnni.e.creative

The souls of black folk in early 21st-century America are Johnny's primary concerns. My writing explores the performance — acts within social constructions — of blackAmericans in contemporary America. Thus far, my creative trajectory has covered issues within the hip hop generation, black masculinity, and the black athlete among other topics. Whether it is a blog, critical essay or literary work, a play or staged performance, a work of journalism, new media, or an academic course, a johnni.e.creative event strives to give insight to contemporary black culture, politics, and performance.

whoartgos:

knotted up
intestines
like brown laces
on aged oxfords
(vintage)

heavy, whiskey
tinted breath

70’s sepia glam

Good isssh

Wearing tweaked couture and framed by sci-fi film sets, West moved from scene to scene, from song to song, rarely standing in any one spot for longer than a few minutes. Megalomaniacs drive us to revulsion when we think of them lounging around and collecting our money. But West works so hard at dragging himself through all the stations he’s set up for himself that he feels like the opposite of a fraud, or a jackass, or whatever else people call him. It would be perverse to not want him, and his drive, in the world.

Sasha Frere-Jones on watching Kanye West perform at the Barclays Center: http://nyr.kr/1hZUBEB (via newyorker)

On Kanye’s Kanye.

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

Gentle Warrior: A. Philip Randolph (1889 - 1979)

  • He was called the most dangerous black in America.
  • He led 250,000 people in the historic 1963 March on Washington.
  • He spoke for all the dispossessed: Blacks, poor Whites, Puerto Ricans, Indians and Mexican Americans.
  • He attained for Black workers their rightful at in the house of Labor.
  • He won the fight to ban discrimination in the armed forces.
  • He organized the 1957-prayer pilgrimage for the civil rights bill.
  • He was President of the Institute, bearing his name, and President Emeritus of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the union he built.

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The words and deeds of A. Philip Randolph show us the unyielding strength of his life-long struggle for full human rights for the Blacks and all the disinherited of the nation. In his cry for freedom and justice, Mr. Randolph is echoing the fury of all the enslaved. They are fighting for their freedom, with the kind of desperate strength that only deep wounds can call forth. With none of his words, however, does Mr. Randolph turn aside the help of others. But these comrades-in-arms must share the vision that has led Mr. Randolph through his long years of search for equal human rights. From the day of his arrival in Harlem in 1911, Mr. Randolph had been in the thick of the struggle for freedom for Black Americans.

#A.PHILIPRANDOLPH #BLACKPERFORMATIVE #FIRSTSEARCH

HappyBirthday Michael Jackson — A Black Performative, 55 years and counting:-)

HappyBirthday Michael Jackson — A Black Performative, 55 years and counting:-)

THE STRUGGLE - FIRST SEARCH FOR THE BLACK PERFORMATIVE

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dr. king had a dream

that he was willing to die for

but what happens to a dream deferred?

so, while y’all sleepin’ 

in a sequence of reality

i ride in the struggle occurred

so God, tell dr. king and ‘em not to worry

i know his story

but i’m rolling with a vision preferred

so, you absurd niggas keep it twisted 

while i keep my gangsta referred

’cause i’m living on the block called the world

and the struggle here don’t end 

i’m determined to make ends meet 

and push that same benz-6

i passed on my way to work this mornin’

this world is cornerin’ me everyday

and i’m on the corner of americanway

passin’ the chicken spot 

the church

and the hoe alleyway

so, i’m prayin’ everyday

eatin’ barbecue wings 

tryin’ to keep my soul full everyday

but with every set of thighs i slide inside

i give up a piece of my soul everyday

and when worse comes to worst

the world took one of my homeboys the other day

caught a bullet to the bag fightin’ over a dime bag

heard the news and my mind 

had visions of my black ass packin’ a black cadillac hearse

so God, tell dr. king and ‘em i ain’t ready to die

but i’m ready to ride in the struggle

and if dying is what it’s worth?

then if need be, come and get me

but not until i finish this verse

A March on Washington for jobs and freedom? … Makes logical sense.
Cleveland Robinson (right), a veteran labor official and civil-rights advocate, was former adviser on labor to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Mr. Robinson (1905-1995) was chairman of the New York State Martin Luther King Jr. Commission at his death. Mr. Robinson was the administrative chairman of the March on Washington in August 1963. At the time, he was also a member of the New York City Commission on Human Rights (New York Times). 
Bayard Rustin (left) was a chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington and the 1964 New York school boycott. Mr. Rustin (1912-1987) was co-chairman, with Leon Lynch, of the A. Philip Randolph Institute, an educational, civil rights and labor organization based in New York, and president of its education fund (New York Times).

A March on Washington for jobs and freedom? … Makes logical sense.

Cleveland Robinson (right), a veteran labor official and civil-rights advocate, was former adviser on labor to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Mr. Robinson (1905-1995) was chairman of the New York State Martin Luther King Jr. Commission at his death. Mr. Robinson was the administrative chairman of the March on Washington in August 1963. At the time, he was also a member of the New York City Commission on Human Rights (New York Times). 

Bayard Rustin (left) was a chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington and the 1964 New York school boycott. Mr. Rustin (1912-1987) was co-chairman, with Leon Lynch, of the A. Philip Randolph Institute, an educational, civil rights and labor organization based in New York, and president of its education fund (New York Times).